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America's Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014

Economic Circumstances Figures

Indicator Econ1.A: Labor force participation rates for young adults ages 18–24 by race and Hispanic origin, annual averages 1980–2013
Labor force participation rates for young adults ages 18–24 by race and Hispanic origin, annual averages 1980–2013

Indicator Econ1.B: Unemployment rates for young adults ages 18–24 by race and Hispanic origin, annual averages 1980–2013
Unemployment rates for young adults ages 18–24 by race and Hispanic origin, annual averages 1980–2013

a Includes other racial and Hispanic origin groups not shown separately.

NOTE: Shaded regions represent recessions as designated by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). These data refer to the civilian non-institutionalized population. Beginning in 2003, estimates for White, Black or African American, and Asian race groups include people who selected that race group only. Prior to 2003, people who reported more than one race were included in the group they identified as the main race. Asian estimates for 2000–2002 are for Asians and Pacific Islanders; beginning in 2003, Asian is a separate category. Persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic may be of any race.

SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Current Population Survey.

Indicator Econ2.A: Median annual earnings (in constant 2012 dollars) for young adults ages 20–24 not enrolled in school by educational attainment, 1980–2012
Median annual earnings (in constant 2012 dollars) for young adults ages 20–24 not enrolled in school by educational attainment, 1980–2012

NOTE: Data on associate's degrees are not available prior to 1995. Earnings are shown in constant 2012 dollars, based on the Consumer Price Index, prepared by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Census Bureau, Current Population Survey.

Indicator Econ2.B: Median annual earnings for young adults ages 20–24 not enrolled in school by gender and race and Hispanic origin, 2012
Median annual earnings for young adults ages 20–24 not enrolled in school by gender and race and Hispanic origin, 2012

‡ Reporting standards not met (too few cases for a reliable estimate).

NOTE: The revised 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards for data on race and ethnicity were used to classify persons into racial groups. Data on race and Hispanic origin are collected separately. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Commerce, Census Bureau, Current Population Survey.

Indicator Econ3: Prevalence of housing problems among all households with young adults ages 18–24 and among very low-income households with young adults by living arrangement, 2011
Prevalence of housing problems among all households with young adults ages 18–24 and among very low-income households with young adults by living arrangement, 2011

* Estimate is zero percent.

NOTE: Very low-income households are those with incomes not exceeding 50 percent of area median income, adjusted for family size. Inadequate housing refers to moderate or severe physical problems with the housing unit. Crowded housing refers to households with more than one person per room. Moderate cost burdens are total housing costs that exceed 30 percent of income, and severe cost burdens exceed 50 percent of income.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research, American Housing Survey.

Indicator Econ4: Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 covered by health insurance at time of interview by type of health insurance,1993–2012
Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 covered by health insurance at time of interview by type of health insurance,1993–2012

NOTE: Medicaid or other public health insurance includes Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and state-sponsored health plans. A small number of young adults were covered by both Medicaid or other public health insurance and private insurance and are only included in the private insurance coverage group.

SOURCE: Center for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey.