ChildStats.gov—Forum on Child and Family Statistics
faces of children
Home  |  About the Forum  |  Publications  |  Data Sources  |  Help
Search

America's Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014

Substance Use Disorder

Substance Use Disorder (SUD) is defined as meeting criteria for illicit drug or alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year specified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV).55 Illicit drugs include marijuana, cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens, inhalants, and the nonmedical use of prescription-type psychotherapeutic drugs. SUD is a serious public health concern in the United States. In addition to causing injuries or death from accidents or violence, SUD has many medical consequences. SUD is also associated with psychosocial and legal problems.

Indicator Health3: Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 who reported they had illicit drug or alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year by gender and race and Hispanic origin, 2002–2012
Percentage of young adults ages 18–24 who reported they had illicit drug or alcohol dependence or abuse in the past year by gender and race and Hispanic origin, 2002–2012

NOTE: For data before 2003, the 1977 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) standards for data on race and ethnicity were used to classify persons into racial groups. The revised 1997 OMB standards were used for data from 2003 and later years. Data from 2003 onward are not directly comparable with data from earlier years. Data on race and Hispanic origin are collected separately. Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

SOURCE: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

  • From 2002 to 2012, the prevalence of past-year SUD among young adult males ages 18–24 (which decreased from 28 percent in 2002 to 23 percent in 2012) was consistently higher than that among their female counterparts (16 percent in 2002 and 2012).
  • In 2012, among young adults, the prevalence of past-year SUD for White, non-Hispanics (21 percent) was higher than that for Hispanics (17 percent) and Black, non-Hispanics (16 percent).
  • Among White, non-Hispanic young adults, the prevalence of past-year SUD decreased from 25 percent in 2002 to 21 percent in 2012.

table icon YAHEALTH3 HTML Table

55 Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2013). Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings. NSDUH Series H-46, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 13-4795. Rockville, MD. Retrieved from http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2012SummNatFindDetTables/NationalFindings/NSDUHresults2012.htm#ch7.